• 2016 How do Men Become Masculine by Marcella Mizzi
    • This paper deals with the question of how men become masculine, focusing specifically on the influence of family law in this process. What will be argued is that when dealing with men, Courts often rely on stereotypic definitions of masculinity (and femininity), thus, keeping them confined within a socially constructed masculinity.
  • 2015 The Issues Faced by the Crime of Forced Marriage under International Criminal Law by Marcella Mizzi
    • This paper advocates for the development of the crime of Forced Marriage under international criminal law, providing an overview of the main legal questions it currently faces. Forced Marriage was defined in an ambiguous AFRC Appeals Judgment, which did very little for advancement of the crime. The most notable issues are its frequent overlap with other established crimes, as well as, its nature, which can be deeply gendered or a gender-neutral, depending on the situation. These factors can create significant confusion, hampering the development of the crime.
  • 2013 Modification of Social and Cultural Patterns of Conduct Article 5 Of The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women                         by Cassie Yusofi
    • The focus of this paper is harmful cultural and social practices and wrongful gender stereotyping, with regard to the Netherlands especially. My aim is to find out how well the Netherlands has implemented Article 5 of the CEDAW. Firstly the establishment, principles and scope of the CEDAW are explained. Then, the cultural issue is clarified with examples of wrongful gender stereotyping. Moreover, an interpretation of the meaning and measures of Article 5 will be given. Further the implementation procedure on domestic level, will be elaborated on, next to the progress of it in the Netherlands and whether the Netherlands has been successful in it according to the Dutch NGO’s. Lastly I will close by describing the Optional Protocol procedure of the CEDAW that deals with customary discrimination.